One Water three years later

I’m excited to share this article from Amber Smith, Education Program Manager at LOTT’s WET Science Center, about One Water: The Infinite Journey. As we gear up to present a Plankton Painting and Science workshop this week, it’s fun to look back on this past collaboration and hear Amber’s perspective on the project. One Water is installed  at the WET Science Center, where its story is shared as part of their education programs.

Thank you Amber!

 

What comes to mind when you think of a wastewater treatment plant? I would bet it’s not a LEED Platinum rated building housing a science center and award-winning education programs. Continue reading “One Water three years later”

Artist Statement

I recently updated my artist statement for a proposal and thought I would share! 

My artworks explore the interface between participant, viewer, and subject, resulting in immersive works that compel change. They are process oriented, drawing from relevant environmental and social issues. The finished artworks themselves are multi-layered, pulling the viewer in. The underlying collaboration and community participation is Art in Action. Continue reading “Artist Statement”

Adventures in Ferrocement featuring the Pollinator Project

One of the wonderful aspects of the Pollinator Project was learning a new art medium, ferrocement. Ferrocement is essentially concrete mortar over a metal armature. Using a metal armature and mesh makes the concrete much stronger, allowing shapes and forms that would be impossible with concrete alone. Continue reading “Adventures in Ferrocement featuring the Pollinator Project”

The Pollinator Extravaganza!

Collaborator and teacher extraordinaire, Quasar Surprise shared the below summary about the culmination of the Pollinator Project. This collaboration resulted in a beautiful cut-flower garden, teaching garden, permanent sculpture with beneficial insect habitat, and so much more! She shared more back story in this newsletter from the summer. 

 

Continue reading “The Pollinator Extravaganza!”

No, not aliens. Plankton!

Studying and painting plankton in this way, really brought out the Naturalist in me. By looking so closely at them, and painting them, I was able to learn so much about each individual species. I already thought plankton were amazing. Now I’m even more in love with them. I can appreciate the uniqueness of the thousands of different species and their important roles on our planet.

“What is that? Some crazy space scene?”

I smiled at the question, secretly pleased. You see, the organisms in the mural I was painting do look completely out of this world. The iridescent shapes on the mural, standing out from the dark, black background, look like nothing other than bizarre space ships flying through space. Continue reading “No, not aliens. Plankton!”

One Water: The Infinite Journey

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This spring, I partnered with LOTT Clean Water Alliance to create an engaging and educational art piece about water for the WET Science Center. I teamed up with LOTT and more than 1,200 Thurston County students and adults to create the new piece titled “One Water – The Infinite Journey” that debuted as part of Spring Arts Walk on April 22 at LOTT’s WET Science Center. The result of this project is not just an art installation; it is a story of water. Continue reading “One Water: The Infinite Journey”

Project Wetlands

Project Wetlands

Located in the wetlands exhibit area at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, this installation creates the illusion of being inside of a wetland while interpreting the important function of wetlands and the necessity to limit the use of plastic bottles. Visitors are immersed in this beautiful and solution-based piece in a setting where they can view and connect to the animals that are affected by this issue. The experience leaves them more open to taking tangible action to conserve wetlands and reduce their use of plastic bottles.

Dimensions: 10’X6’X12’

Medium: Upcycled plastic bottles, dyed water, steel rod.

Installation Date: August 2015

Collaborators: Northwest Trek Wildlife Park and park visitors.

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Project Wetlands Close

Project Wetlands

Puget Sound Multi-Porpoise Project

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As part of my Artist Residency at Sherman Elementary School, in Tacoma, we created this Student Collaborative Art Project. During the project, students created hundreds of shimmering Pacific herring from up-cycled Capri-sun pouches. The school of herring is suspended in the shape of two harbor porpoises. Stabilized by student created clay shells that are native to the region, this artwork looks closely at the relationship of plastics and how we impact the earth.

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The Unseen Spiral

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This Leatherback Sea Turtle was commissioned by the Oregon Country Fair (OCF), summer 2015. It was a collaboration between myself, Annie Douglas, and many amazing volunteers! The intention of the piece was to shed light on some of the problem materials at OCF. The shell of the turtle is made from Asceptic containers (soy milk and the like), other upcycled materials, and bamboo. Inside the turtle is a representation of the Pacific Gyre, now known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Leatherback Sea Turtles’ existence is threatened by all of the plastic in the ocean. They and countless other marine animals die from ingesting plastics each year. OCF is situated on the Long John River, which feeds into the Pacific Ocean. The piece connects how what we do on land ultimately affects the oceans, and the entire world. One of my favorite moments at the fair was when a five year old boy told me how leatherbacks favorite food is jellyfish and that plastic bags floating in the water look just like jellies, and so the sea turtles eat them by mistake, and how awful that is. He was spot on. Listen to our children! They know what’s important!

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The Plastic Whale Project

The Plastic Whale is a 32-foot long gray whale made of plastic bags and other plastic trash. It was created during the spring of 2013 by over 900 youth and adults in Thurston County as part of an education and outreach project about plastic bags. The project engages the public in learning about plastics in our environment in a creative way. They learn about options to reduce the use of plastic bags in our county. Continue reading “The Plastic Whale Project”